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Ugly Duckling

Ugly Duckling

Naïve young Indian-American Mia Makarand is in Paris trying to start a career in translation and interpretation. But finding work is hard and she’s feeling lonely and isolated. Worse yet, her dream of becoming a writer looks like it’s dead in the water. But Mia is tougher than she thinks. And her sharp eye and caustic wit are helping her to see that success and ...

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£8.99

9780955807817


ISBN 13: 978 0 9558078 17

Publisher: Revenge Ink

Format: 127mm x 203mm

Binding: Paperback

Extent: 584 pages

BIC subject: Fiction

Publication : March 2009

A straight-talking novel from first-time writer/publisher Amita Mukerjee.

Naïve young Indian-American Mia Makarand is in Paris trying to start a career in translation and interpretation. But finding work is hard and she’s feeling lonely and isolated. Worse yet, her dream of becoming a writer looks like it’s dead in the water. But Mia is tougher than she thinks. And her sharp eye and caustic wit are helping her to see that success and happiness are important, but nowhere near as valuable as self-respect and that little thing called dignity.

The Author

Amita Mukerjee is a writer and publisher of Indian origin. She lives in Paris where she once worked as an interpreter and translator.

The Publisher

Amita and her brother Gopal Mukerjee founded Revenge Ink to present new types of narrative that are edgy, progressive and bold. They are challenging the conventions of the mainstream, highbrow publishing industry by show-casing cutting-edge works from subversive new writers. The first two novels, Ugly Duckling and The Armageddon Mandala, have a scabrous straight-talking tone and voice-driven approach that most mainstream publishers wouldn’t readily touch.

Review

Meet Mia Makarand narrating her tale as a Paris-based translator and interpreter in Amita Mukerjee’s Ugly Duckling. 'I just did the minimum nécessaire and went to work and sat there like a cement sack. Then I interpreted like I was in a trance. And when it was done, I got out of there and came home and took as long as I could to recover,' says Mia. In contrast, her colleagues were far more alert and involved. 'They liked what they did and expressed concern for what they did. At work they talked, during breaks they discussed things like work, clients, invoices, where to have lunch, relationships... And upon arriving, they sought drinking water, terms I hadn't thought of, speakers accents, terms they'd spotted in someone else's glossary, terms they could ask delegates for, terms that were obtuse and obscure. Generally they behaved like people who were alive and deeply interested in what they were doing.' Engaging read.”- D. Murali, The Hindu, Chennai, India

 

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